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Desert Rat

Hello,

It would be very interesting for all those who have the knowledge and images to describe what type of early WW1 communications were used in the trenches?

These very early years must have produced some imaginative, useful and no doubt very ingenuitive products that the War Office and the Generals decided to try out, and eventually use.Interesting would be the trench telephones and the system they used to communicate to each other. Yes they had runners with "Top Priority" messages (as Adolph Hitler was a runner, nearly reaching the centre for the message to be delivered was shot (I think twice?) and was rescued by a fellow German soldier, taken to the aid station and finally recovered----if only he had been left in the mud to die----maybe there would not have been a Second World War???), what type and make were used, what were pretty useless....and those most widely used by the British, French and German Armies.

Thank You All....Looking forward to your 

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Desert Rat

In advance, I / We on MCN,

Thank You for your replies and all that you can enlighten us with and greater knowledge than most of us!

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val
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Desert Rat

Hello Val,

Many Thanks for the link...It should be very interesting

Best to you...Ian/ Desert Rat

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val
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@Desert Rat, are you familiar with the Fullerphone?

http://www.wftw.nl/ful.html

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Desert Rat

Brilliant Val,

This man had the answers, so it seems. Perhaps a difficult subject due to the very early years of telegraphy, telephony etc?

None the less ...Thanks as very interesting to follow up on this type of communications during WW1 that many of us really do not understand...100+ years ago.

Many Thanks....Best to you....Ian/ Desert Rat

 

Maj. Gen. A.C.Fuller CBE, the inventor of the Fullerphone, showing his Princess Mary medal.

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val
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Desert Rat

Well Val,

Superb link, how interesting, full of true and unknown facts to many of us. I really did not know at all that the Germans could intercept the British "chat", thus give them a good advantage over the British, and then the Brits having to speak in code...amazing to read!

As in WW2 (you may have seen the WW2 film (Windtalkers???) about the Navajo indians with a special code that the Japs could not break...It's all amazing to me!

Many Grateful Thanks, best to you....Desert Rat/ Ian

 

• The use of telephones on the battlefield presented new security risks as the enemy could easily intercept the communications • Thousands of casualties resulted from intercepted telephone conversations until army staff started to speak in code to minimise this risk • Engineers worked to improve the design of telephone cables to prevent the leakage of signals…

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val
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Desert Rat

Thanks Val,

All this communications info will confuse me.....Maybe just a small glass of red wine to relax me, that's what the Doctor told me!

Thanks though for all the great info......Best to you...Desert Rat/ Ian

A GLASS OF RED A DAY---KEEPS THE DOCTORS AWAY!!!.jpg

Edited by Desert Rat
correction to text

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val
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Desert Rat

Hello Val,

No I havent, dont know where it is?, I could have researched where on Google, but time as for all of us is precious and I haven't always the time to visit all these superb places.

Best to you....Ian

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val
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@Desert Rat : The Royal Signals Museum is a military museum based at Blandford Camp in the civil parish of Tarrant Monkton, northwest of the town of Blandford Forum in Dorset, England.

Visit it, make some good photos and post for us here!

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Desert Rat

Hello Val,

 

I don't know it but I have been to the Bovington Tank Museum a few years ago, so it should be pretty close by to find.

Thanks & Best to you......Ian

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