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  1. Björn

    Björn

    Private


    • Points

      12

    • Content Count

      12


  2. Richard Auld

    Richard Auld

    Sergeant


    • Points

      11

    • Content Count

      352


  3. Manu Della Valle

    Manu Della Valle

    Staff Sergeant


    • Points

      8

    • Content Count

      1,221


  4. Desert Rat

    Desert Rat

    Sergeant


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      2,134



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 16/09/19 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Its always nice to get one back that you owned in the past. Just got back my Late war Quist M40. nice textbook example, less the strap. Q66, pig skin liner. Rear apron marked.
  2. 2 points
  3. 2 points
    Great example of “transitional” DAK koppeltragegestell...these sets are quite scarce and even on the same league as the earlier all-green,sturdier and thicker Y-straps as far as rarity is concerned they’re less “glamorous” but very interesting nonetheless.
  4. 2 points
    Very Nice Item Manu, Great images and good history with it, thanks for showing us on MCN. Best to you....Desert Rat/ Ian
  5. 2 points
    Guys, Market find again. These were still current when I left in 2008. Rich
  6. 2 points
    Thanks Val, I will sort out the flags etc and add them to a new topic....Best to you....Ian
  7. 1 point
    After the initial Blitzkrieg campaigns, the army decided it wanted a number of improvements made to its small portable radiotelephone (see Fuspr.a.1). Although the concept was proven the FuSp.a.1 had a number of weaknesses. The switching between receive and transmit, the weak aluminium casing and the short battery life were addressed by a brand-new design using the new 2.4 Volt valves. Rather than an Anode battery, the new radio received a switched power supply (Wechselrichter) to supply the high voltage to the valves. The volume control and receiver fine tuning were fitted to a remote control unit that could be plugged onto the radio or worn on the belt. At the same time, the frequency range of the new models was slightly adjusted, the new "b" model would operate from 90 to 110 MHz. Like before, the frequency dial was calibrated in channels, this time channels 211 to 240. The new radio was called the "Feldfunksprecher b" (Feldfu.b) and had a range of approximately 1.2 km. With that the channel distance about half that of the Fusp.a.1, two Feldfu.b's operating on different networks should be kept at least 20 meters apart and have at least 2 channels separation. To tell the Feldfu.b apart from other models, a red dot was painted on the rear lid and a red feeler shape added to the top of the casing. The antenna was also marked in red to avoid confusion. The early Feldfu.b's had a 80 cm long two part sectioned antenna: a short antenna rod on the bottom and a longer "whip" section on the top. In 1943 the two part antenna was replaced with a 72.5 cm long foldable "Bandantenne". The bakelite casing of the Feldfu.b still proved too weak, the rim of the casing and the hinge of the rear lid would easily break so in early 1944 a sturdier casing was introduced and with it the Felfu.b1 model. In late 1944 a final modification was made, the electronic circuit was re-designed to contain one less valve, this simplified model was the Feldfu.b2. The Feldfu.b, b1 and b2 models remained fully compatible with each other. Below a comparison of the b, b1 and b2 models: From the front angle, the main identification is the the name of the Feldfunksprecher painted on the box. Likewise on the back of the box: Note the metal two part hinge for the back compartment door introduced with the Feldfu.b1. The b2 reverted back to the one part hinge. The early b-type box on the right shows its typical weakness: the rear lid has broken off at the hinge. From the top view, some changes to the shape of the bakelite box between the b and the b1/b2 models become apparent. Note the red feeler dots on top of the boxes. A comparison of the early b1 two-part antenna and the later foldable antenna. The next two photographs aim to highlight the differences between the early b and late b1/b2 boxes: the early box on the right has a considerably thinner rim than the later box on the left. Also note that on the later models, rubber buffers were added to the box. Another view highlights the thin-rim early b model left and the thick-rim b1 model on the right. The front panels show a slight evolution between the models: The only difference between the b and b1 models is the tag plate for the frequency calibration lock screw (top right of the panel). The B2 model is identical to the b1 apart from the colour change to grey. The back panels show a similar slight evolution (from the left: b2, b1, b) The early b lid on the right has a simple hinge. The inside of the lid has a plate describing how to fold the antenna and what accessories belong to the radio. The b1 model in the centre no longer has the data plate and a modified hinge design. On the b2 model the hinge design reverted back that of the earlier b, but a metal sliding guide was added to prevent the lid opening too far and breaking off. The inside of the detachable front lid contains a plate with the operating instructions for the radio: Although the operating instructions remained the same, different versions of the heading "Bedienungsanweisung für die Feldfunksprecher b, c, f und h" can be found. Early examples only mention the b and c, while later versions mention the b1 etc. This particular lid would be correct for a 1942/43 Feldfu b, c f or h. Each Feldfunksprecher was supplied with a number of accessories: Here the accessories for the Feldfu.b1 are shown: 2,4NC28 battery (2,4 Volt, Nickel Cadmium, 28 Ah); a lumbar support, foldable antenna, Dfh.f headphones and Kmf.c throat microphone and remote control cable. The battery was connect to the battery leads of the radio, these were shaped so that they could not be switched between + and -: Note how the shape of the positive contact prevents it to be connected to the minus side. The battery slides into the battery compartment and is secured with a webbing strap: Note how on the b1 model, the double hinge allows the rear lid to be folded underneath the radio. Doing this with the the early b lid would cause it to break off. The rest of the accessories tightly fit into the bottom compartment: To prepare the Feldfunksprecher for operation, the accessories are attached: Note how the cable from the headphones and microphone are held to the remote control cable with leather straps, this prevents the cables from snagging to other equipment worn by the infantryman. The Feldfunksprecher would be supported by the standard "Y-straps" of the infantryman with the lumber support held to the belt with leather loops. The infantryman's "A-frame" could be attached to the back of the Feldfunksprecher: A number of manuals and documents were supplied with the Feldfunkspecher: For those interested in the technology contained in the Feldfunksprecher, here is the circuit diagram: During reception, valve 1 serves as the HF amplifier stage, valve 2 as the oscillator/detector (superregenerative receiver) and valve 3 as audio ampllfier. During transmission, valve 3 serves a microphone amplifier with valve 2 as HF oscillator/power valve while valve 1 acts as a feedback amplifier. Also note that the receiver fine tuning uses an electromechanical drive to adjust a small capacitor. The supply voltage to this drive is controlled by a voltage regulator (EW = Eisen Wasserstoff Wiederstand = Iron hydrogen resistor) resembling a small lamp. If this resistor is missing or replaced with an ordinary lamp, the remote control drive will burn out. So never operate a Feldfunksprecher without first checking that the correct voltage regulator is in place! In the later b2 model, the audio amplifier valve was omitted: Due to the omission of the low frequency amplifier stage, the Feldfu.b2 had a slightly reduced range from 1200 to 800 meters. The reduced range was however offset by a much longer battery life (roughly 50% longer) and a slight reduction in manufacturing cost and time. Note: The development of the Feldfu.b2 demonstrates a key difference in the portable radio design philosophies between the German and particularly the US army. The Germans pushed their designs to achieve maximum battery life while the US pushed the levels of technical sophistication (using FM, AFC, squelch circuits etc.). This reflects the differences in the logistical situation faced by the German and US armies; the radio battery supply demands for a US unit were no doubt a multitude of those of a comparable German unit. The Feldfunksprechers were designed to be used by relatively untrained operators, they were typically carried by a runner staying in shouting distance to the unit commander. In some cases, unit commanders can be seen carrying the Feldfunksprecher themselves. Simple cartoon like instructions taught the operator the basic do's and don'ts: The final pictures give an impression of a "Sprechfunker" an infantryman carrying the Feldfunksprecher: He carries all the normal equipment of an infantryman. He has replaced his left hand ammunition pouch for a belt loop to make some space for the remote control of the radio. With the switchbox of the throat microphone he can switch between receive and transmit while the remote control allow him to adjust the volume and fine tune the receiver. The Feldfunksprecher is attached to the belt and the Y-straps. All the normal infantry equipment can still be carried as normal. Normally the front lid would be fitted to the radio, the Sprechfunker is carrying the lid under his Y-strap until it can be refitted. Note how the remote control cable plugs into the radio. The A-frame is strapped to the back of the Feldfunksprecher. The infantryman has to be a bit careful shouldering his rifle but it just about fits next to the radio. The infantryman is now ready for his mission The Feldfu. b is probably the most common of the Feldfunksprecher types found today. This is not surprising as every infantry company had four Feldfu.b's assigned to it. The Company commander could assign the Feldfunksprechers to his individual platoons as he saw fit. In defence the Feldfunksprechers were often use to back up important field telephone lines while during fast moving battles the Feldfunksprechers would become the main means of communication in the Company. For security the operators would use code words for important commands, terrain features, commander names etc. These code words could be written with pencil on the white pad on the front lid. Some care had to be taken choosing words used, as with a throat microphone some letters like "s" and "f" can not be distinguished. To avoid confusion, a tag with the phonetic alphabet was also attached to the front lid. As with most radio equipment, finding the radio itself is only the start as the accessories are typically far more difficult to find.
  8. 1 point
    So I investigated a bit further, to see what this screw was connected to. And look at this. The screw is connected to the HF module. It makes a very good grounding link between the HF module and the chassi. It is clearly a deliberate improvement of the weakness of the beforementioned single screw grounding of the HF module. The b1 model also of course has the support bracket for the R2 relay. It also has the reinforcement springs around the antenna and grounding contacts, (wich are secured with nuts and bolts, and not riveted together) In addition the b1 model has also received a rubber buffer to the left of these contacts, to stabilize the top of the module and eliminate sideways movement against the chassi. (the module is still mounted on the pertinax plate in the bottom, and also this new grounding screw is located towards the bottom of the module) The rubber buffer secures it from sideways movement that in time might make the mounting and grounding screws come loose (the radio is made to be carried on the back in the field under combat situations. It should withstand and work under lots of shaking and rough treatment). And the last difference or improvement that I have found on the b1 model, is the improved servicehatch for the RL2,4T1 tube. This hatch now has a hole in it, and a small spring mounted, to ease the opening of the hatch and access to the radiotube. I hope these evolutionary differences that I have found, might be of interest to the community here. After posting these differences that I have found on a facebook forum, @Funksammler confirmed after checking on his own radios, that indeed after early 1944 the screw that connects the HF module to the chassi is clearly a deliberate and systematic improvement of the weakness of the beforementioned single screw grounding of the HF module, And it is not only a special improvement on feldfu b1, but also found on 1944 models of feldfu f and also on feldfu b2 Best Regards Bjørn
  9. 1 point
    And back to the b1 evolution of the feldfu radio. The first thing i noticed, when cleaning the b1 frontplate, was a screw that I had not seen before on the other radios.
  10. 1 point
    The module is secured with 4 screws. But only one (slightly larger) screw of the 4 is actually connected to the chassi and hence the only thing grounding the entire module to the chassi. This screw is almost always a cause of problem or malfunctioning/reduced capacity of these radios. I have found on my own radios, that this screw was somewhat loose, and had a bad contact between the module and the chassi. I have taken these screws out, cleaned them and oiled them before putting them back in. In one of my radios, I had a problem with Mithör from the throat microphone in RX position, and a poorly functioning R1 relay. It all came from this screw. (marked with a red arrow)
  11. 1 point
    The grounding weakness is that the whole module is mounted on a insulating pertinax plate.
  12. 1 point
    The Feldfu. b1 has got even more improvements. The most importaint improvement is both a mechanical and electric improvement. In all b models, there is a significant weakness in the grounding of the HF and transmission stage. These two pictures are of a earlier b model.
  13. 1 point
    The R2 relay, has gotten a support bracket.
  14. 1 point
    The next radio is a later Feldfu. b. It's what I would call a hybrid between a Feldfu. b and a Feldfu. b1. The antenna and ground contacts have received reinforcement springs to improve electrical connection. The contacts are no longer riveted to the chassi and to the porecelain antenna bracket, but mounted with nuts and bolts instead.
  15. 1 point
    Thank you @val. Nice to see you again too 🙂 Absolutely - This forum platform has a lot more potential than the WAF. I am looking foreward to participate more here at MCN. The total forum layout is very good and easy to navigate in. And posting pictures is a dream. Not to mention the exellent layout of the threads - And I know for sure that we have the right crew as Moderators here too 😎 Anyway, back to the topic. This antenna has the original leather strap to keep the two parts together. But the flexible whip has been repaired/replaced on it.
  16. 1 point
    Hi @Björn nice to have you here. As you soon noticed, technical platform and capabilities here are far greater than at WAF.
  17. 1 point
    This radio also came with a two-part Stabantenne 80 cm. I had two antennas of this type, but only recently - a couple of days ago, I traded one of the two antennas away.
  18. 1 point
    The other thing I noticed on this radio, was that it does not have reinforcement springs mounted around the antenna and ground-contacts on top of the radio unit. Also note that the copper springs/contacts are riveted and not screwed to the chassi and to the porcelain antennabracket.
  19. 1 point
    Anyway, while doing maintainance on the different radios, I started to notice some mechanical differences or evolutionary improvements that has been done. I will try to post some pictures and explain what I have found. First I have some pictures of a first spec. Feldfu. b. This radio does not seem to have any evolutionary modifications done. The first thing I noticed is that there is no stabilizing or reinforcement bracket on the R2 relay next to the RL2,4T1 tube. Marked with a red ring, where this bracket usually is mounted. It does not look like that it has ever been mounted on this radio.
  20. 1 point
    Hello guys. I'm new to this forum, and I have read some of these threads here with great interest. My name is Björn and I'm a Norwegian collector who mainly collects equipment related to the armed forces of the Wehrmacht Heer. Some of you might know me from before - from the WAF, and from some debate groups on facebook. As I understand, quite a few of the members regarding communications equipment has migrated here from the WAF. I was encouraged to join this forum by @Funksammler on one of the facebook groups. Anyway, German ww2 communication eqipment, and especially the feldfunksprecher radios is of great interest to me. At the time being i have 4 such radios - 3 feldfu b's and one feldfu b1 (one of the feldfu b's is unfortinently missing the bakelite case) , I have one Handladesatz a, and one Frequenzprüfgerät f (unfortinently missing it's bakelite case) in my collection. I have succsessfully managed to bring all of them / keep all of them in working useable condition.
  21. 1 point
    Ian, Still no answer? Are you a fraudster? You seem quite pleased that you fliped it at a profit regardless of its authenticity, why did you even ask on this thread if it was already gone? Do you beleive everything the 'seller' tells you as that seems to be a trend in your posts? Not to worry eh? Rich
  22. 1 point
    Thank you mate...I try to domy best,as usual!
  23. 1 point
    Hey Tony can't wait to hold that in my hands. I sold my Q 64 a couple of months ago and I regret it. The feel of the Q's in the hands just feels different. Gonna keep my eye out for one. Best, Eric
  24. 1 point
    Hello Tony, Yes you are right.....Scary.....But super items and great images. Just sold my WW1 German 1915 got a good price for it. Haven't seen any, anywhere like mine for 10 years, I would have much prefered for you to buy it...but money always a big crapper to find the money for items that we know are a - Very good bargain - for our collection or to sell on for a profit. Like all my French Resistance items, too many here to list....but I may start a new topic on them all with images. Still got the original French Resistance used/ found in the roof of a farmhouse that was in the Ardeche HQ (Sten Gun (MK2) I fired in France, but here in the UK now and all a deact now UK/EU 2018... but it all makes a superb display with the brassards/ armbands of all the hundreds of FFI/FTP/FTPF/ MUR/ FFL/ CDL/ SNCF/ brassards that were made/ fabricated for every Maquis unit across France....They ALL wanted to be seen (especially when they knew the invasion was coming) joined up and when their city, town - resau was liberated - on with the armbands. Best Wishes My Friend...&..Take Care IanB/ UK
  25. 1 point
    Just got this Q66 put together on a display head. Still have to get the chinstrap sewn up on one end so haven't put it on yet. Not very knowledgeable on gasmask's but looks authentic to me also has the container with no strap's. Didn't think of my three year old daughter when I put it up on the shelf. But she won't go in that room now. Tried to show her it's not real to no avail. Anyone else ever have this problem?
  26. 1 point
    Excellent @Manu Della Valle! One piece I am yet to acquire for my tropical display. The close up photos are nice!
  27. 1 point
    Looks great with the Helmet!
  28. 1 point
    Mike, Nicely struck medals, I see this sort of thing a lot but as I have said not my area. I will keep my eyes open and if they are cheap and chearful I will take them in the future. Rich
  29. 1 point
    I am not an expert but that is Billy Basic stuff. Are you going to refund the poor person? Rich
  30. 1 point
    Instead of that pennant spend your money on this https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9920733/hitler-eva-braun-knickers-auction/
  31. 1 point
    Ian, I should take it back, it is very poor quality, see attached picture for areas that are inconsistant with period production. If it is from that time period then could have been made by a kid for example as a school project but not the story you have been sold. Note the swastika is not straight or centred on the white circle. Note the white circle is not circular.
  32. 1 point
    I have the tin for it with no holes and no strap's .
  33. 1 point
    Late-War Gefechtspack made of recycled internal suspenders for the M34->Feldblusen.The strap for the kochgeschirr is another ersatz piece made of recycled Italian leather and most likely a strap of Slovak webbing.The ditty bag is a RBNr’d mid-late war specimen but I also have a very late unmarked one without grommets for the laces which will be a better match imo Enjoy
  34. 1 point
    After some testing, determined that the master oscillator and power amplifier work fine. Got a 0.7 A current on the antenna power meter with the dummy load. Troubleshooting the keying / control circuit. Since I can only use CW for 472 KHz.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    Can you share the jewish arm band story? Just in case? Sorry, but i have experience that usually fraudsters have very nice story to tell to make the fraudulent item plausible.
  37. 1 point
    Hi Ian,. when you work out a price, would you PM me?? Cheers. Norrie
  38. 1 point
    HUGE Military Collection for sale. The items acquired after 60 years of collecting and dealing now offered and priced to SELL!!!! Will sell single pieces or in bulk. More than 50,000 individual items to be sold starting at U$5.00 and up. Over 500 Pre 1890 (mostly original black powder muskets) must GO! Insignia, uniforms, boots, shoes, bayonets, knives, swords, helmets, hats, caps and helmets! WWI and WWII items Mostly acquired from US, UK, Canadian veterans. You name it, we have it for sale. Photos show only a portion of the collection. Will be listing single items as well. Everything offered is 1000% Guaranteed or your money back! No reasonable offers refused! Can pick up locally or items shipped AT COST! Don't miss a chance to get a piece of history!!!!!
  39. 1 point
    For sale! A wonderful group including the tunic, matching trousers and boots! Came from Germany as you see it. Lieutenant in a flak unit that has definitely seen some use and action. Over all in very good condition with a few nips but nothing significant. Shipping is included. $1300 or BEST OFFER. PayPal is preferable
  40. 1 point
    Guys, Again cheap and chearful on the market. Bloke recons that the person did some gardening work for his town? Rich
  41. 1 point
    Guys, Again from the market. A nice hand worked piece of leather well mounted, all of his mates have signed a dedication on the reverse. Rich
  42. 1 point
    Guy, Today Flohmarkt. Rich
  43. 1 point
    Guys, Some more detail. Not doing very well with mobile camera so back to desktop. Please note the effect of long contact with light surface rust on the cloth or webbing straps. Rich
  44. 1 point
    Guys, Bit of a Cold war day today at the Flohmarkt. Rich
  45. 1 point
    Hello Val, I, hope you are well, yes I bought some great and rare French Resistance items - I had a good time in France and bought many French Resistance - flags/ brassards (arm bands) a Very Rare - BBC message Personels- book 1943 / diary of the code messages that the SOE wireless ops (while in "The Field" in France) sent to the UK via the French Resistance - some messages now translated by my teacher mate are crazy, but they were waiting for their own "Special Message" from SOE in relation to parachute drops of arms, ammo, explosives and tobacco, which most if not all Maquis were desperate for....a good English cigarette, and more importantly waiting for the call when the - Invasion would come? I will not add the French message but the translation sent but in English - The little boats have no legs/ The pencil is blue/ Jules likes Italian cigars/ The beer is good/ The woman with the beard is shaved/ To take the taxi you need money/ Archibald is eating the spinach/Fabienne has arrived well/ Jean will have twins/ The white peas are cooked/ Bebert is eating the bannanas/ The Devil plays the Lottery/ ....33 pages of these message sent to England and returned with parachute drops and information - that I don't even understand? But to actually find a diary/ book like this is virtually impossible - it has many different people writing and receiving these messages, but if caught with this book, the Sicherdienstheit ? Gestapo would have this man tortured to extreme to find his Maquis names, members, names and addresses, and more so the SOE wireless operator. if he gave nothing away during this torture - he and probably his family would all be shot. I am still looking for an MCR1 - Biscuit Radio - favoured by the Maquis. I have a friend who has x2 B2 suitcase radio's that he wanted to sell me x1 but he has put them in Museums now...so another lost chance( But I at lease have the BBC- Message Personals" diary dated 1943...which is a treasure to find! Best Wishes Val....Ian
  46. 1 point
    Anything DAK or Tropical, also looking for matching # K98 bayonets
  47. 1 point
    It’s a very rare set,only 2 are knowed, from Hutter where he also own the batteries box and mine .As it’s written in german ‘ Werkstatt ‘ it means workshop , normaly not situed On frontline . The set is developped in 1944 by Staru in Stassfurt , it’s a big factory producing civilian sets , and military like feldfu , fusprech , klein fu set d, also a special receiver for the fritz X . No technical notice is knowed , serial number is 35 not a lot were made . freq pruf f is used on frontline for quick check of frequency, but when a fauly feldfu can’t be repaired , they send it to workshop where they measure , modulation , selectivity ,voltages , with the help of this wonderfull set The former French owner of this set , had let it works on some functions, he removes some connectors but it can be renew . At the lower part of inside cover label it’s mentioned 4) auf kanal212 messen
  48. 1 point
    Since there is no "e" type of the Feldunksprechers, this is an opportune place to discuss some of the auxiliary equipment used with the Feldfunksprechers. The first is the "Frequenzprüfer f", a crystal calibrator used to calibrate the Feldfu.b and c models. The second is the "Handladesatz a", a manual generator used to recharge the 2.4 NC 28 batteries. The final is the Trb NC 28, a box designed to carry a spare 2,4 NC 28 battery. The Frequenzprüfer f (Fprüf.f) came in the same bakelite box as the Feldfunksprechers so it could be carried to the frontline units if required. The top of the Fprüf.f was devoid of an antenna connection and had three round feeler shapes painted yellow. This allowed it to be distinguished in the dark from the Feldfu.b (one dot) and Feldfu.c (two dots) The yellow theme was carrying over to the rear lid, which had a yellow circle painted on it to provide easy visual recognition: The front panel held the frequency calibration unit at the top. There was no internal battery, so a battery cable allows the calibrator to be connected to a 2.4 NC 28 battery placed next to the unit. A calibration screwdriver on the bottom section completes the front panel: The Frequenzprüfer was a essentially a first line maintenance kit carrying spares and tools to test the Feldfunkprecher b and c models. Most of the space inside the box was reserved for spare valves and other bits of test equipment. The top compartment held a "Tasche (Fu) c" with spare valves, iron-hydrogen resistors, voltage indicator lamps, spare remote control units and test dummy load. The bottom compartment held a "Tasche (Fu) d" with spare vibrator units, Dfh.f, Kmf.c, test cable and microphone elements. The two small bottom compartments were for two spare antennas (one Feldfu b and one Feldfu c) and two spare remote control cables. The inside of the rear lid contains a list of it's contents (not in such good condition in this example): The frequency tester itself contained a crystal oscillator that generates a very accurate frequency on 26 Mhz. It was to be placed one meter away from the Feldfunksprecher being tested and both units were switched on to warm up. The small amount of HF energy radiated by the battery cable would be enough to reach Feldfunksprecher: The Feldfunksprecher had to be tuned to the red channel (233 for the Feldfu.b and 203 for the Feldfu.c) with the receiver fine tuning set to the central position (so that the red dot is visible through the hole of the remote control unit). The Feldfu.b would pick up the fourth harmonic at 104 MHz while the Feldfu.c would use the sixth harmonic at 156 MHz. After warming up for about ten minutes the static noise in the headphones of the Feldfunksprecher was checked. If a loud static could be heard, the tuning screwdriver was used to open the calibration opening (by turning the little screw on the top right of the Feldfunksprecher front panel) after which the trimmer behind the calibration opening could be reached with the screwdriver. The trimmer was now turned left and right until the static noise was at it's minimum. The Fprüf.f could only be used to calibrate the receiver of the Feldfunksprecher, to test the transmitter a second calibrated Feldfunksprecher would be required. Typically this would not be required as the transmitter largely uses the same oscillating circuit as the receiver. For transmitter testing, first the power output of the transmitter could be checked however using the "Senderprüfer a", a small dummyload fitted to the antenna socket of the Feldfunksprecher: The "Senderprüfer a" should light up when the transmit button is pushed on the switchbox of the Kmf.c. Talking into the microphone should show a small variation in the strength of the light. Because the transmitter calibration could not be done with the Feldfunksprecher fitted in its case, a "Prüfkabel" was used so that the Feldfunksprecher could be operated outside it's box: With the "Prüfkabel" fitted, all the calibration controls inside the transceiver could be reached: Note that the antenna is no longer connected in this configuration but the short antenna contacts on the internal unit would radiate enough energy to be picked up by a second Feldfunksprecher placed some meters away. Both Feldfunksprechers would be adjusted to the red calibration channel with the receiver fine tuning set to the central position. The transmitter switch on the Feldfunksprecher under test would be pressed and the signal would be checked on the second Feldfunksprecher. If the strongest signal should be achieved well within the range of the receiver fine tuning control. If this was not the case, the transmitter calibration trimmer (C9 in the schematic) had to be adjusted. With these tests and calibrations done, the Feldfunksprecher would be once again ready for operation. Similar frequency calibrators were developed for the Feldfu.f and Feldfu.h radios, these were the FPrüf.h and FPrüf.k respectively. In deviation from the calibration method described above, the FPrüf.h and k were used to calibrate the transmitter directly. For this reason they were provided with an additional headphone jack. A second auxiliary unit required to keep the Feldfunksprechers operational would be the "Handlasesatz a" (HLS a), a hand operated battery charger. Again the bakelite housing of the Feldfunksprechers was used to house the charger so that it could easily to carried in the field to wherever the Feldfunksprechers were used: The bakelite housing the the HLS.a was left unpainted, strangely the inside of the housing did receive a coat of paint. The front panel contains the generator at the top and a battery tester plus connections at the bottom. The back of the HLS.a contains a storage space for up to two 2.4 NC 28 batteries, hand crank, loading cable, test cable and tree anchor: The top of the box shows a small window under a cover. The HLS.a legend is painted in blue paint and a blue elongated feeler shape tells the HLS/a apart from all other versions: The small window allows the speed indicator of the generator to be observed. A mirror inside the protective lid could be adjusted so that the indicator can be obverse while cranking the handle. This allows the user to keep the generator turning at the right speed for loading the batteries: the back of the panel shows a chained pin which can be secured in one of two holes. This allows either one or two 2.4 NC 28 batteries to be locked in place inside the box: The accessories and cables are shown separately, the strap of the tree anchor is missing here. The metal brackets could be screwed into a tree so that the HLS.a could be securely tied to the tree at a convenient height. The 2.4 NC 28 could be tested with the test cable and the battery tester: If the battery required charging, it would be connected to the charging cable. If the battery was connected via the charging cable, it could also be tested by pushing the test button on the battery tester. With the crank handle fitted to the generator, the HLS.a is ready for charging: Charging the battery with the HLS.a was a lengthy business. The HLS.a could supply a maximum loading current of 4 A, meaning that a full charge of a 2,4 NC 28 battery would take seven hours! Normally, the battery under charge was placed inside the HLS.a, the charging cable was fed through a hole on the right bottom to the interior of the charger. The battery would be secured using the pin on the side: I can imagine that "charging duty" was not very popular with the soldiers. It is likely that turns were taken to operate the HLS.a. This also explains why the tree anchor was such an essential accessory, as he HLS.a had to be fixed in the most comfortable position for the lengthy charging process. It would probably have been a 24/7 job to keep a Company's four Feldfunksprechers up to charge.... Another late war accessory developed to extend the autonomy of the Feldfunksprechers was the Trb NC 28 (Trageblech NC 28) battery case for an extra 2.4 NC 28 battery. The 2,4 NC 28 battery fits snugly into the box: The Trb NC 28 was designed to fit against the back of the Feldfunksprecher; it was supposed to be connected by some leather straps and hooks to the D-rings of the Feldfunksprecher. However no Trb NC 28 has ever been found with the original straps attached, all boxes found today appear to be unfinished products recovered from factory stores (and judging from the writing on their lids, used postwar as storage containers for nuts and bolts etc.) HLS.a can still be found regularly, most are in mint condition and 1943 and 44 dated. Since there is no mention of the HLS.a in earlier Feldfunksprecher manuals it is likely that it was only introduced late in the war. Most HLS.a's found today seem to have been unissued examples recovered from stores. the Fprüf.f is a different story and is extremely rare. It is likely that a Division's Nachrichtenabteilung only had one or two Fprüf.f's to maintain the Division's stock of Feldfu.b's and c's. Given the high cost of Feldfunksprecher accessories today, it is going to be a challenge to restock a Fprüf.f with all its spares. Only one example of a fully complete Fprüf.f complete with the Taschen (Fu) c and d exists to my knowledge.
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    The Feldfunksprecher f was developed to meet the need of the Panzergrenadiere to have a portable radio that would put them in direct communication with the tanks they were supporting. The FU5 set in the tanks (Ukw.E.e + 10 W.S.c) operated from 27 to 33 MHz, a much lower frequency than the previous b and c versions. The capacitors and coils in the oscillating circuit were redesigned to adapt to the new frequency, the Feldfu.f covered a range from 28 to 33 Mhz. The longer wavelength of 10 m required a much longer antenna, the ideal length of 2.5 meters was halved again by using a lengthening coil in the antenna circuit. The Feldfu.f used a 1.20 meter long strip antenna. As before the Feldfu.f followed the now familiar design of the front panel to the side of the radio housed in a bakelite box: All the controls were identical to the other Feldfunksprecher models with the frequency dial at the top, the removable remote control with volume and receiver fine tuning controls in the centre and the battery charge checker on the left of the headset sockets and finally the on/off switch at the bottom. Unlike other Feldfunksprecher models, the frequency scale of the "f" is calibrated directly in MHz: 280 stands for 28 MHz while 330 stands for 33 MHz. A calibration channel is marked in red at 32 MHz. Whereas the tuning control of the b and c models clicks in place of the separate channels, the control of the "f" model is continuous. Note the slightly different frequency control indicator used on the Feldfu.f. When looking at the casing of the Feldfu.f, a few differences with the other models emerge. The first is the angled antenna base to deal with the significantly longer antenna length. The longer antenna could no longer be folded to be stored inside the bakelite housing, so a separate antenna bag was required, connected to the D-rings on the housing. Note that most Feldfu.f's were supplied in the later "thick rim" box introduced at the start of 1944 although some early production "f"'s used the "thin rim" box. Unlike the Feldfu.b, whose name was changed to Feldfu.b1 with the introduction of the new box, the name of the Feldfu.f was not changed. In late 1944 the Feldfu.f did follow the change to the two-valve design of the Feldfu.b2, this version became know as the Feldfu.f1. A white angle feeler shape is apparent on the top of the box and as usual the Feldfu.f legend is painted on top of the box. The white identification theme continues on the back lid, a white circle and the Feldfu.f legend are painted on the back lid. Note the two part hinge of the rear lid also introduced on the Feldfu.b1 model. The rear of the radio shows of the "thick rim" design clearly, with the rubber buffers connected to the housing. The D-rings would carry the antenna bag or in operation could support the A-frame, which was further secured with the leather strap on the bottom. A closer look at the antenna shows the 1.20 meter "Bandantenne" and carrying bag. The antenna bag is made out of thin "Ersatz" leather and holds the antenna folded in three. A small press stud closes the bag at one end. Two loops with carbine hooks are sewn to the bag to suspend the bag from the Feldfunksprecher casing: A close up reveals the length stamped onto the antenna. Note that the antenna does not have the metal hooks used on the shorter Feldfu antennas to fold it. Also note that the white colour coding is not used on the antenna. The same antenna was shared with the Feldfu.h model which used an orange colour coding. Apart from the antenna, all the accessories are as per the other Feldfunksprechers: the Rückenstütze lumbar support, battery, remote control cable, Dfh.f and Kmf.c could be packed into the back of the casing when required: Also the "Sturmgepack" A-frame could be attached to the back of the radio. If the A-frame was worn, the antenna bag could no longer be attached. When the radio was in operation this was not a problem, as the empty antenna bag could be folded and stored inside the radio: The following pictures show an impression of a Panzergrenadier NCO with the Feldfunksprecher f. Usually the Feldfunksprechers were carried by a messenger, but in some cases officers or NCO's chose to wear the radio themselves: As usual the cables of the headphones and throat microphone are clipped to the remote control cable and pass along the belt. Because there is no space on the belt due to the MP40 pouches, the NCO has fixed the remote control to his Y-straps, Note how the angled antenna is kept well away from the wearer's helmet. Even if the Panzergrenadier lies down, the angle of the antenna will allow communication to continue: The Feldfunksprecher f was introduced relatively late in the war compared to the other models. There is some evidence that the Feldfu.f was first used during the Kursk offensive (July-August 1943), most Feldfu.f's found today are 1944 (thick rim) production models. The Feldfu.f was part of the radio installation of the Panzer and Panzergrenadier command halftracks and would allow the commanders to stay in contact when outside their vehicles. When introduced, the Feldfunksprecher f would have had a major impact on infantry-tank cooperation; at last the Panzergrenadiere could act as the eye and ears of the Panzer crews, and the Panzers could provide the heavy support to the Panzergrenadiere when required. Feldfunksprecher f's are a relatively rare find today with the antenna and antenna bag proving hard to find accessories.
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