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  1. Mike H

    Mike H

    Corporal


    • Points

      29

    • Content Count

      116


  2. Gwar

    Gwar

    Lance Corporal


    • Points

      29

    • Content Count

      96


  3. val

    val

    Warrant Officer 3rd Class


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      772


  4. Björn

    Björn

    Corporal


    • Points

      6

    • Content Count

      151



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/11/19 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Salty 2 place with 1870/71 campaign medal and Centanary Medal.
  2. 2 points
    The aluminum RAD cap badge made for the Arbeitsdienstmutze was introduced in 1935 as the new official Mutzenabzeichen. The badge was made in aluminum and featured two shafts of wheat that branched upward from the bottom of the spade handle, in the center was a upright spade with a swastika in the center and the inner portion of a black swastika pebbled, the border edge in red.
  3. 2 points
    @Davejb, Yes, these aren't non existent and come up for sale on a few trusted sites but they are pricey. The Holy grail would be a Arbeitsfuhrer or Gauarbeitsfuhrer cap with the gold piping and gold hand embroidered insignia, pictured is a Schimutze with the double flaps ( Ober -und Unterklappe ) and the traditional Robin Hood hat also for the high ranking leaders as we see here a supposed hat worn by the Reichsarbeitsfuher Hierl ( Red background ) and another that belonged to ??? Thanks for the response.. G
  4. 2 points
    In or around 1937 orders were issued directing all officers above the rank of Feldmeister to wear a hand embroidered version done by hand using a "Unterlagen" or pattern which was labor intensive to replace the enameled version.
  5. 2 points
    There also existed many different manufacturing traits as seen here
  6. 2 points
    There were many manufactures of this particular piece and it is not uncommon to find one with the "L" in the wrong facing position but not often.
  7. 2 points
    The reverse of the insignia should have the letters of the maker or their logo or both, along with the last two digits of the year produced and a triangle with the rad acceptance mark inside RLAD, the "L" is most commonly seen and referred to as a "J" bit it is a backwards "L" and it stands for " Reichsleitung des Arbeitsdienstes " and there is most times the "GES GESH" which is for "Gesetzlich Geschutzt" or protected by law. There were also two prongs for attachment.
  8. 2 points
    Thanks for the interest, @Davejb. You're absolutely right in your assumption. Un-covered leather insoles would definently ruin most of the heat-preserving qualities of the boots. The soles inside the boots are indeed covered with the very same felt material as the main body of the boots are made of. And if you add woollen inlay soles to the equation, the insulation value will proberbly prove to be quite adequate for sub-zero temperatures. (at least to some extent) However, when the temperature falls to below -35-40°C I think that even more precautions need to be taken to prevent frostbite, at least when staying outside over prolonged time periods. Best Regards Björn
  9. 2 points
    From 2004 but has a wealth of information. From the Pigeon Corps to the Oak Leaves of the Knights Cross
  10. 1 point
    I take it that these templates , before sowing, had the two long parts at the side , removed and them the whole item joined via the sowing??
  11. 1 point
    They look like pressed card or paper,very fragile
  12. 1 point
    The flashlight you have there is MX991/U https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulton_MX991/U_Flashlight
  13. 1 point
    Hi @Budgetburrito, upload those pictures directly here, it's super easy and more convenient for forum users, they don't need to go to some other website but see images here.
  14. 1 point
    This nice Prussian Golden Merit Cross arrived today. Instituted Jan 1912 it is a three piece design and could be awarded to both civilian and military personnel. This award came in silver also.
  15. 1 point
    Agreed, older stuff is often like real art.
  16. 1 point
    After the devastating first winter on the eastern front - the winter of 1941-42, the German army soon realized that they were not equipped for the harsh conditions of the russian winter. What they initially thought would be a quick attack and decisive victory, proved to be a agonizing battle against temperatures wich dropped to below -50°C (-58°F). With over stretched supply lines, fuel shortage and Insufficient clothing and footwear the German soldiers fell in the thousands, not so much from battle wounds, but mostly from serious frostbite and gangrene. The standard German marching boots were not at all designed to be used in such low temperatures. The german army had already in 1939 implemented the thick felt overboots and the sheep skin lined sentry coats. These sheep skin lined overcoats were used extensively on the eastern front, and also here in the Northern parts of Norway from early in the war. The felt overboots ( Wachstiefel) were made to be worn over the marching boots for static guard or watch duty only, and are very hard to move around in. In the first winter of 1941-42 the germans soon discovered that the Russian soldiers were far better equipped for the winter conditions. The russian soldiers were equipped with Valenki on their feet. These were winter boots made of felt (prewar model) and felt boots with leather reinforcements (wartime issue) Here are some examples of the Russian Valenki. These are not mine, only shown for reference. Pictures found on the internet. Here's the prewar model: And the leather reinforced wartime model: The Russian Valenki soon became a sought after footwear for the freezing German soldiers. There are lots of wartime pictures of German soldiers and officers wearing these Russian boots on the eastern front. The russian Valenki had a really high shaft, wich went all the way up to the knees, when worn. I believe that in the first picture here, the Germans are wearing captured russian boots:
  17. 1 point
    I always wonder if they ever saw one another again.
  18. 1 point
    I like those King Billy medals, they don't command a lot in value but what a well struck medal with lots of detail. Piece of art really? Rich
  19. 1 point
    Today would be a good day to have some of the German winter equipment tested. Its a beautiful day here above the arctic circle where I live. And we have - 16 degrees Celcius here now. I have added a small video wich I made in the car at work this morning. 20191111_084635.mp4
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    @Björn, for those Filzstiefel they quite often added the leather rings.
  22. 1 point
    They produced them somewhere in Russia too https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-J18132,_Sowjetunion,_Filzstiefel_für_die_Wehrmacht.jpg
  23. 1 point
    Really like what is left of that ribbon! Rich
  24. 1 point
    Another member and myself recently had a discussion on RAD buckles and how some are faked. First introduced in early 36' the buckle replaced the old FAD variants and adapted a new uniform look, designed by Ergon Jantke who was already a fixture in Third Reich as the "Technical Advisor" for the RAD high command designing uniforms, insignia and other items. The buckle was described as having the "New" RAD emblem of a pointed shovel surrounded by five ears of corn in a circle with a pebbled field, no lettering was visible. The construction was a one piece die struck aluminum and there were several manufactures, the most prolific being in the Ludenscheid area ie; FW Assman, Richard Sieper & Sohns, Steinhaur & Luck, etc; etc;
  25. 1 point
    Now I have to admit I'm neither a RAD or buckle collector but that was damn interesting! Thank you
  26. 1 point
    A recent "Fake" is the LGS or L Gottlieb & Sohn, similar in comparison to the GB buckle but the casting process left a mark or "Bubble" on the Spaten. This one is really close in look, but the overall construction without giving too many details is alarming. So, when considering a purchase of any buckle you are unsure of, ask a Forum like this or others and seek input before parting ways with your cash, the bottom line is to have quality items in your collection at a reasonable price and the satisfaction of knowing all your pieces are genuine. Hope this helped someone, any questions or comments are welcome.. G
  27. 1 point
    This one catches people out a lot.. A cast Gustave Brehmer, there is a identifier though, a cast "Flaw" under the Spaten, recently though the fakers I believe have corrected this impurity, either way they are still being sold as "Replica" but who is to say they don't fall into the hands of unscrupulous sellers on the internet or dealers asleep at the wheel.
  28. 1 point
    Again, RAD buckles were never made in steel..
  29. 1 point
    Rad buckles were never produced in steel. The tell here is also the faint but visible "Dot" left over from the fakers during the process.
  30. 1 point
    The RAD were considered a State Organization and therefore were not governed by the control of the RZM and no buckles should have any RZM markings whatsoever. Here is a very bad fake from the Czech Republic, no Third Reich buckle was ever produced or manufactured in this fashion and any and all in this configuration are to be considered Fake.
  31. 1 point
    Jim, here are a few of the one's I had mentioned..
  32. 1 point
    BAD BAD BAD Czech or Polish fake.. The WORST..NO BUCKLE EVER was constructed like this..
  33. 1 point
    Another steel buckle, the tell here is the die circle on the catch... BAD bad bad...
  34. 1 point
    Rich, yes, I have most of the makers one could ever hope to find.. trust me.. and yes there are a few fakers out there lurking in the back alleys.. For example... This is a horrible fake made of steel.....
  35. 1 point
    Saxe Coburg Gotha. Silberne Verdienstmedaille des Herzoglich Sachsen-Ernestinischen Hausordens Herzog Carl Eduard Awarded 1905-1918 for Meritorious Service to the Homeland. A bit about Carl Eduard, at wars end not only did Carl Eduard lose his German titles but being the Grandson of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert he also lost his English titles in 1919. Carl Eduard joined the NSDAP rising to the rank of SA Obergruppenfuhrer became a member of the Reichstag and head of the German Red Cross. Captured and imprisoned by American occupation forces he died penniless in 1954.
  36. 1 point
    Guys, My favourite bit today, patriotic pencil with a siver top holding a picture of Hindenburg. Rich
  37. 1 point
    Langensalza Medal awarded by the former Kingdom of Hannover, to her sons who fought the Prussians to a standstill during the Bruderkrieg of 1866. Although a temporary victory was obtained, Hannover was forced to surrender several days later, with its kingdom and army being absorbed by the Prussian victors. Interestingly, Kaiser Wilhelm I, allowed the former regiments of Hannover to wear all honors and awards to be worn, including the medals of the 1866 war.An interesting feature of the Langensalza medal is that the recipients name appears on the edge. No doubt due to Hannover's long association with the forces of Great Britain, notably the King's German Legion, who served with distinction during the Napoleonic wars. The medals of England nearly always have the recipients name appearing on the edge.One other interesting fact regarding the Langensalza battle was the appearance for the first time of the Red Cross emblem being worn by medical personnel
  38. 1 point
    Scwarzburg-Rudolstadt War Merit Medal.
  39. 1 point
    Wurttemburg Silver Merit Medal
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
    Also this Austrian Balkans Campaign Medal.
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    At first I almost didn't spot the guy half way up the wall of the trench.
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
    Some artillery action
  47. 1 point
    CdV's Bavarian soldiers circa 1880's
  48. 1 point
    Nice Kriegsverdienstkreuz.
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    Prince Heinrich of Bavaria. KIA in Romania 1916.
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